Case Studies

Ian Bowler and Brynmor Dafys – Woodland Skills Course 2010/2011

Ian and Bryn met on the Woodland skills course and have now set up their own business – Brynmorian Susatainable Woodland Management. Their ongoing projects include a 35 acre Oak woodland and an 9 acre overgrown Hazel coppice both in need of restoration and management. They are also undertaking smaller projects such as hedgelaying and tree planting.

The newest member of their team (spring 2012) – Bonnie, a heavy Cob is being trained for horse logging and will be used to extract timber on ecologically sensitive sites and areas of limited access.


Lou Hawker – Woodland Skills Course 2009/2010

Lou now works at CAT (Centre for Alternative Technology), Macynlleth.
She is working as Woodland Manager at ‘Coed Gwern’, a 15 acre woodland recently acquired by the Centre. Responsibilities will include managing the woodfuel supply for the centre and helping to run the woodland/Craft courses.


Adam Thorogood – Woodland Skills Course 2008/2009

Adam and a friend approached a woodland owner about working a piece of neglected woodland. The owner asked them to produce a management plan. As a result the woodland went into the ‘Better Woodlands for Wales’ scheme. Adam and his Friend are now working the woods in return for the harvested timber. They intend to add value by producing fence posts and garden furniture as well as supplying firewood locally.

“This is exactly the kind of opportunity that was envisiged by the college when we designed the Woodland Skills Course. It is very heartening for us at Coppicewood to that our course equips students for the opportunities that are available.”


 

Testimonials

I’m very grateful for my time at Coppicewood College.  The course was highly recommended to me by alumni Jamie Miller.  The learning experience was consistently nourishing.  I now have the skills to confidently and safely use a multitude of tools related to coppicing and green woodworking.  The course has provided me with vocational and self developmental momentum to follow a true passion for a sustainable way of working with wood. As a result of completing the course, avenues of work are opening up which is very encouraging.

In addition to sharing their extensive knowledge of coppicing and green woodworking, Barbara, Nick and Martin have the attractive quality of being actively supportive of each other as well as the learners which creates a generally supportive environment characterizing Coppicewood College. The environment is often referred to as a teacher in itself and at Coppicewood College it is difficult not to be uplifted by the environment which has been maintained with minimal carbon footprint prioritising the needs of the natural surroundings. On numerous occasions I felt healed by the silence of the woodlands broken only by the sound of a restless chif chaf or a calling of a crow passing over head.
The experiences being created at the College are a welcome contribution to a world where learning experiences have become increasingly alienating where the needs of education are tied to the needs of the economy and increased bureaucracy have at times become restrictive.

It has been a life changing year with the birth of my daughter Seirian and learning I have done at the College.

Thank you for making my time at Coppicewood College thoroughly enjoyable and unforgettable.

Kelly – Woodland Skills 2011/2012


 

“Much more than a careful training in traditional coppice skills and the basics of green woodworking. The course has been a practical education in the use and guardianship of native woodland delivered with deep integrity, grace and humour. It has been a privelage to spend time among such good people in such a wholesome environment.”

James Bullen – Woodland Skills 2010/2011


“Its Spring and the sap is rising and I’ve come to the end of a fabulous six month course.
I’m the proud owner of a shave horse, designed and made my own ‘winter hedge'(clothes horse to my former self). I have learnt to take down a tree safely and in the direction i wanted with just an axe.
I am now laying hedges for friends and i have conquered my fear of horses to experience a day of horse logging.
The words beetles and snedding, froes and billhooks are now in common usage in our household.
Its been a wonderful and varied experience with friendly people and lots of cakes.
Can some one pay for me to do it all again!”

Gill Griffiths – Woodland Skills 2010/2011